Classic: CHICKEN TETRAZZINI

Hello Guys & Dolls,

A while back I came across a recipe called Chicken Tetrazzini. I think I found it on a blog that listed some classic 1950s dishes. So what does one do when they haven't heard of something but want to learn more, I googled it of course. The first recipe I saw for it contained pasta, cheese, more cheese, organ clogging amounts of cheese & I was instantly not very hungry anymore. It did however intrigue me. Did more people make this hearty meal?

Well it appears that Chicken Tetrazzini is still a recipe alive & well today. Even Martha Stewart has a recipe up for it on her site.
http://www.marthastewart.com/343648/chicken-tetrazzini
So does Giada De Laurentiis ...
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/chicken-tetrazzini-recipe.html

The one thing you'll notice is that both of these recipes are clearly different with the exception of; chicken, pasta, peas.

I found this particular recipe once more digging through Betty Crocker's Picture Cook Book & with two extra ingredients I had not seen before in any of the other recipes I knew I had to try it for myself.

What are the two extra ingredients you might ask....
Pimento Olives
& Shaved Almonds

I was right in my assumption (as you can tell by the video), but it wasn't too bad. I may remake it like Maratha or Giada's recipe however.

Recipe!
Cook until brown & crisp...
2 - 3 slices of bacon cut up

Add and brown lightly in the bacon fat...
1/3 cup minced onion
1/2 cup minced green pepper

Add....
1/4 cup minced pimento olives
1/4 cup shaved almonds
8 oz macaroni
2 cups cook chicken breast
1 3/4 cup cooked & drained peas
2 cups shredded american cheese

"Mix lightly with hot drained Boiled Macaroni. Heat...using chicken broth (OR PASTA WATER) to mositen. Serve hot on chop plate garnished with tomato slices, parsley, & ripe olives.
Amount: 8 servings"

Don't forget to subscribe! & tell me if you're going to try it!
XOXO
Miss Semi Sweet

"Supper Dishes." Betty Crocker's Picture Cook Book. N.p.: McGraw-Hill, 1956. 382. Print.